To share or not to share?

Moral Dilemma: Your child has a packet of sweets. Another child comes up and asks if he/she can have a sweet. Do you encourage your child to share, or not to share?

In the past, the answer would have been simple: share. Recently, however, there’s been a new line of thought encouraging children not to share. What’s the argument against sharing, and is there merit to this perspective? Keep reading to find out more.

Don’t share

Credits: Jason

  1. SHARE SELECTIVELY ONLY.

    Children should have the choice to share what they want, and what they don’t. Why should they share everything? As adults, we don’t share everything.

  2. FORCED SHARING AIN’T SHARING.

    Learning to share is a lesson best taught by experience, not by force. Through force, children wouldn’t learn the lesson of “sharing”, they’d learn the lesson of being resentful every time they shared. This defeats the purpose of sharing – all it teaches them is to be bitter when they see authority figures. It’s the parent or the authority figure who shares at the end of the day, not the child.

  3. DEMANDING = SHARING.

    We’re teaching other children that they can get an item from another child just by demanding it. Is it truly a child’s right to have everything shared with them?

  4. LIFE LESSON = WE DON’T ALWAYS GET WHAT WE WANT.

    Allowing kids to not share allows the individual who suffers the rejection to learn that in life, we don’t necessarily always get what we want. We can ask for it, but if the other individual is unwilling to share, pushing them any further is simply a demand.

  5. VALUE OF SHARED ITEM DIFFERS.

    Everyone places a different value on items. While one may place an immense value on a cat toy, another may find it insignificant. You might love your Ferrari car, but another might value his/her rusty Toyota filled with good memories more – you might not know it.

Share

Credits: Donnie Jones

  1. TO MAKE AND KEEP FRIENDS.

    Human beings do not live in isolation. Sharing, while it may start of physically, teaches kids how to build relationships. Later on, sharing can be transferred to non-tangible things, and be the basis for emotional intimacy.

  2. TEACHES THEM HOW TO TAKE TURNS.

    Eventually, when children enter school, they’re mingling with a large crowd. To make sure that everyone’s treated fairly, often children have to take turns. Why not learn that now?

  3. TEACHES THEM PATIENCE

    It teaches them to wait patiently – we don’t always get to hog what we strongly desire all the time.

  4. LEARN TO BE GENEROUS.

    If you have something wonderful, when you share it with someone else, ideally it increases your happiness – because you are adding joy to someone else’s life.

  5. LEARN ABOUT CARING FOR OTHERS.

    When child A shares with child B, in an ideal scenario, child A tunes into child B’s feelings, empathizes with the other child, and therefore shares. Child A can now better empathize with others, and thereby show care and consideration for the community.

Our Stance: Share

Our stance is that sharing is caring. According to the ASEAN+3 Conference for Social Enterprises, “People who share are more able to share happiness making them more mindful and happier.” We completely agree, sharing helps us learn certain soft skills, including empathy and social skills. In a world that’s becoming more isolated and more technology-filled, sharing teaches us to have a heart, and reminds us of our own humanity, and that of others.

However, we realize that everyone has a different perspectives. We’re keen to hear your opinions – what’s your stance on the sharing debate and why? Let us know by commenting below!

References

Meldrum, K. (2019). Debate Club: Should You Teach Your Kids to Share?. Retrieved from https://www.mother.ly/parenting/debate-club-should-you-teach-your-kids-to-share

Pruett, K. (2018). Is Learning to Share a Mandatory Skill?. Retrieved from https://www.psychologytoday.com/us/blog/once-upon-child/201802/is-learning-share-mandatory-skill

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